Easy Coin Magic: 60+ Effects To Choose From

Easy Coin Magic: 60+ Effects To Choose From

Learn all the basics of coin magic, the fundamental moves, advanced techniques, and great routines to follow in this series of full coin effects with Ben Salinas. With the help of this course and a little practice, you can be a stunning coin illusionist in no time!

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Easy Coin Magic: 60+ Effects To Choose From
  • Introduction: Easy Coin Magic

    Ben Salinas introduces his series Easy Coin Magic, the quintessential collection of coin magic for any aspiring magic attempting to advance their sleight of hand artistry. Everything you'll need is included here: the basics, the rudimentary moves, some advanced techniques, and great routines appl...

  • Holds, Grips & Palms

    To begin your journey towards becoming an excellent coin magician, it's essential to learn some of the basic holds, grips, and palms that you'll have to apply to many routines while practicing coin magic. Starting with the Finger Palm, a concealment technique you'll use very often throughout this...

  • Ramsay Subtlety

    The Ramsey Subtlety, credited to John Ramsay, is the perfect concealment that'll stump your audience every time. You'll be able to reveal a completely empty hand, while still shielding the coin from their probing eyes. You'll just need the basics of finger palm, and you'll be set, ready to includ...

  • Classic Palm

    The Classic Palm is just that, a classic. It may be the oldest way documented for concealing a coin in existence. Easy to master, an invaluable tool to keep at the ready in your coin magic arsenal. You'll be coming back to this move again and again.

  • Kaps

    Invented by the Dutch magician Fred Kaps, is the Kaps Subtlety. This move is a natural extension to the Classic Palm. A very simple maneuver that only involves two things: Classic Palm and turning your open hand towards yourself. This gives the audience a good view of your hand, while still keepi...

  • Fingertip Rest

    The name says it all with this next subtlety. The coin will rest directly on the plantar side of your fingertips. This enables you to casually place your hand on any flat surface without arousing suspicion amongst your audience. You can naturally and effortlessly transition from Classic Palm to t...

  • Thumb Palm

    In one swift movement from the tips of your fingers to your thumb, you'll clip the coin so smooth and quickly that no one will be able to figure out where it disappeared to. Another subtlety you'll want to keep in your back pocket for more exhilarating coin magic to come.

  • Downs Palm

    From the crowned "King of Koins" T. Nelson Downs, comes the Downs Palm. This classic handling allows you to easily vanish a coin, and to make it reappear just as effortlessly. You'll even be able to present an empty hand to your audience after completing this compelling concealment.

  • Back Clip

    The Back Clip, also known as the Tenkai Pinch, the coin disappears by being quite literally clipped out to the back the hand. Once you've ushered the coin out the rear side of your hand, your pinky will clip it into place. If you're careful to mind your angles when performing this move, it'll giv...

  • Back Palm

    Now, Ben presents a classic coin move from the olden days of coin manipulation. To perform the Back Palm, you'll do just that - palm the coin on the backside of your hand. You'll swoop your two middle fingers down and underneath the coin, scooping to the back of your hand. Perfecting this move wi...

  • Deep Back Clip

    Now we have the Deep Back Clip, a production maneuver. You'll start with just one, singular coin. Then, with one slight toss - another with miraculously appear out of thin air. Remember, this is another move only to be used when your audience is gathered close around you looking down at your han...

  • Edge Grip Variation 1

    Ben demonstrates two versions of the Edge Grip, another classic coin concealment from way back when. The first version has you clip the coin between the tips of your thumb and middle finger, where a view of its position has been obstructed. To really sell the move, you'll need another coin to dra...

  • Curl Palm

    Next is the Curl Palm, which is a great in-between move. A highly useful utility move that can be helpful when bridging the gaps in routine between other holds and palms. Let's say you had a coin in Edge Palm, how do you explain the awkward position your hands are in when the extra coin has been ...

  • JW Grip

    This next fun little piece of coin magic is the JW Grip, created by Jimmy Wilson in the 1940s. It's a grip that has seen a notable increase in popularity within coin magic in recent years. After watching the tutorial, you'll understand why. The second phalange on your first finger holds the coin ...

  • Bobo Switch

    The first sleight to introduce the shift into utility moves is none other than J.B. Bobo's Bobo Switch. You'll learn to wondrously replace one coin with another by throwing one of the coins back and forth between your hands. It all takes place under the cover of that very throwing motion. One las...

  • Shuttle Pass

    The next is an essential utility move, the Shuttle Pass. This move will have audiences thinking you're doing nothing more than tossing two coins back and forth, but there is always more going on behind the scenes than any good magician lets on. You're really just tossing one coin back and forth w...

  • Al Baker Steal

    Imagine the Shuttle Pass, but with one more coin added into the mix. Imagining it? Then you've basically got yourself the Al Baker Steal. You'll start with four coins in one hand, and you'll nonchalantly toss them to your other hand. There should be four coins in your other hand now, right? Wrong...

  • Friction Palm

    Most often credited to Johnny Benzais, the Friction Palm is another way of tossing a number of coins from one hand to the other while secretly leaving one behind. This time, you won't need to utilize any palming techniques, though - the coin left behind will be held in place by nothing other than...

  • Click Pass

    The next utility to learn is the Click Pass. This move is for when you have a couple of coins in one hand, and you need to convincingly pass them into the other... The catch? You want to leave one behind. How can you really sell this? What will make it almost impossible to doubt that you've done ...

  • Spellbound

    This next move, Spellbound, allows you to transpose two coins. One minute the coin is in one hand, the next minute a completely different coin has mysteriously taken its place. All it takes is a little rub, rub, rub and you've done something extraordinary.

  • Spellbound Variation

    Ben presents a variation of the Spellbound change. Almost everything is the same, except for one thing. This variation uses the French Drop for a smoother, sans rubbing transposition. You'll also be able to present an actual, completely empty hand to the audience afterward. A win, win.

  • Han Ping Chen

    This move is an old classic from the deep dark depths of coin magic. It's a method of getting all of your coins into one hand, similarly to the Shuttle Pass. In recent years though, Han Ping Chen has been all but completely replaced with more modern and efficient moves. Nevertheless, it is a trul...

  • Finger Palm Production

    To begin the transition to productions, making a coin appear at your fingertips, is the Finger Palm Production. This production is easy to learn, practical and versatile. It can be used to produce a coin from behind someone's ear, behind an object on a table and much more.

  • Classic Palm Production

    Next is the Classic Palm Production. You'll do a little wave and out of nowhere, a coin appears. What's going on here? To figure it out, you have to look no farther than its name. You release the coin from Classic Palm during your waving motion. In an instance, where there was no coin in sight, t...